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"My Way or The Highway"

It always amazes me when someone says to me, "well, that is not the way we do it here." The implication, of course, is that their way is correct and my way is incorrect.

While I can respect a person who believes their method is the correct way, people who say, "well, that is not the way we do it here" typically do not respect any other point of view or methodology for doing something.They are basically saying, "it is my way or the highway."

If people never challenged conventional thinking or methodologies then there would never be any progress.It is important to always look to see if there are more efficient or effective methods for doing something.That is how progress occurs.

The real estate industry, more than most, seems to be filled with individuals who take the "my way or the highway approach.As a result, the industry seems to cater less to what the public wants and more to what they think is best.

If the "my way or the highway folks put aside their ego for a moment and listened to the public they would hear that some of the conventional thinking is outdated and that the public wants better methodologies implemented.Here are some examples:

1. Compensation - The public is tired of the 6% conventional compensation model. They think that real estate agents are overcompensated for the services provided. They believe that advances in technology should have led to a reduction in the conventional rate.The public wants the industry to develop a more equitable compensation model that rewards the services provided based upon the time spent by the agent providing advice, not based upon the ultimate sales price of the home.

2. Scheduling Appointments - Sellers do not want to receive calls from other real estate agents regarding scheduling showings of their homes. Sellers believe that one of the duties of their agent is to be an intermediary for them and to coordinate the scheduling of all showings.They believe agents who do not provide scheduling coordination are lazy.Despite this perception, firms continue utilizing this methodology.

3. Assisted Showings - Buyers that hire their own agent for buyer representation do not want seller agents present during a showing.When you speak to buyers after a showing where the seller's agent was present, an overwhelming majority say that the seller's agent made them feel uncomfortable.In thebuyers opinion, they hired their own agent so that they did not have to deal with the seller's agent. Again, the public believes that one of the roles of an agent is to be a true intermediary alleviating the need for them to work directly with the seller or the seller's agent.

4. Electronic Lockboxes - The public wants agents to utilize the most recent technology to ensure that access to their home is monitored to the best of the agent's ability.Many agents currently utilize electronic lockboxes which can only be opened by digitally encrypted keys.The keys and boxes create a permanent digital record so that the owner knows who accessed their home and when.Despite this technology being available, many agents in Vermont do not utilize it. In fact, because so many showings are done after regular business hours, many agents will leave the keys in an envelope at their office dropbox or at the property itself without ever seeing who is taking the keys.

5. Closing Coordinators - The public expects that if they are purchasing a property, their agent will be the primary contact throughout and that one of the duties of their agent will be to coordinate the closing.Instead of listening to the public, most firms have a "closing coordinator."These coordinators are typically salaried employees.In some cases they are paid per closing.In either event, if the firm did not utilize a third party closing coordinator then presumably they could charge the client less.Thus, not only does the public not want to have to communicate with a third party, but the methodology is inefficient from an economic standpoint as well.

6. Print Ads of Listings - The public does not want to see print ads of listings anymore. In our environmentally conscious society and given the fact that all buyers are looking online these days, the public views print ads of listings as a waste of paper and resources. The public would much prefer that firms utilize the internet and spend resources there rather than waste paper.

7. Pictures on Business Cards - Only would an industry run by "my way or the highway folks still believe that a picture on a business card is a good idea.I cannot think of any other industry where people still include a picture of themselves on their card.I don't think any business card designer today would suggest putting a picture on your card primarily because the public does not want to see pictures on business cards.

8. Luxury Cars and Vanity Plates - More than any other industry, in real estate there is a perceived need to drive the most expensive car possible.In many cases, agents cannot afford to drive a luxury car but do so anyway.The theory is that the public will equate an agent's track record for successful transactions with the type of car being driven.There also seems to be a theory that a vanity plate on the luxury car adds to that perception.In this day and age, the public does not want their agent to drive a car they cannot afford.The public wants agents to be themselves and drive the car that is right for them.The public is very good at picking up on facades and when they do the person putting up the facade loses credibility.

9.Buying Listings - There is a practice in the real estate industry known as "buying listings."This is the practice where an agent will tell a seller that their home is worth more than it is simply to secure the listing.The agent will overprice the home initially to get the listing and then when it does not sell, the agent convinces the seller to reduce the price.While this practice is unethical, it happens more than anyone likes to admit.The problem with the practice is that it not only does a disservice to the particular seller, it does a disservice to the public.It hampers the ability of the public to get a sense of the true market value of properties.

10.Commission Outside the Transaction - The real estate industry is peculiar in many ways, but one in particular is that its participants view their compensation as somehow distinct and separate from the transaction in which they participate.For instance, say that a buyer offers a seller $196,000 for their home. And let's say the seller won't sell for less than $198,000.Assume for a moment the seller's agent is the only agent involved in the transaction and stands to make a 6% commission should the parties come to an agreement and the sale occurs.Instead of reducing their commission from $11,760 to $9,760, the agent will risk losing the sale by telling the buyer they need to increase their offer to $198,000.If the buyer refuses, the agent will let the deal die rather than giving up $2,000.From the public's perspective the commission is integral to the transaction.It is the largest transactional fee to either side and it has the potential to bring deals together.

At Flat Fee, we do things differently. We work with you to meet your real estate needs. We want what's best for you. We're here to change the way people think of real estate. If you're ready for a forward thinking real estate company, contact us.

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