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TRY IT NO THANKS

Blog :: 2012

Thank You

With the end of the year quickly approaching we just wanted to take a moment to thank all of those who supported us in 2012. We would particularly like to thank our buyers and sellers who made 2012 our most successful year to date.

When we started 5 years ago, many doubted whether our innovative real estate model could survive in Vermont. Few thought we could withstand the predictable backlash from those who had traditionally charged more. Well not only did we survive, we have thrived.

So far in 2012 we have sold more than $35,000,000 worth of Vermont real estate. This ranks us #8 out of more than 400 active firms in Vermont.

We believe that our success is as much about our abilities as it is about Vermonters standing up for consumer choice. We hope that all of you will continue helping us spread our message of consumer choice and that we can continue saving Vermonters money by changing the way that real estate brokerage services are offered in Vermont.

Thank you again. Happy Holidays!

Agents Wanted - Rutland, Brattleboro and Saint Johnsbury

Now that our model has taken hold and thrived in Chittenden County, Windsor County and surrounding communities, we are now looking for agents in Rutland, Brattleboro and Saint Johnsbury to help expand our foothold in Vermont.

Flat Fee is looking for new agents all over the state. Check out all of our career opportunities here. Not finding what you're looking for? Contact us here.

Comments

  1. Iury on

    All life insurance is a form of eastte planning.If you're asking about life insurance used as a funding vehicle to pay for confiscatory eastte and inheritance taxes, as well as income taxes with respect to decedent (our easttes get to pay income taxes after we die, including untaxed IRA and qualified retirement plans these taxes can be substantial for almost everyone), then I've included some links below to several trade associations of life insurance agents that specialize in using life insurance for eastte liquidity:National Association of Insurance and Financial AdvisorsSociety of Financial Service Professionals

    Censorship - Realtors Association

    On September 30, 2011, after consulting with the National Association of Realtors, the Northwestern Vermont Board of Realtors demanded that Flat Fee Real Estate remove the following blog post:

    "The average Vermont family make $51,200 per year. What do you think real estate agents make?

    According to data from the MLS and based upon the traditional 6% commission model charged by other firms, the top 5 agents in Chittenden County so far this year (January to July 22nd) have made between $292,000 and $587,000. Thus, they are on pace to make between $600,000 and $1,000,000 this year alone.

    It is remarkable during the worst recession in history that real estate agents in a small community like Chittenden County can make in excess of $500,000 per year, much less $1,000,000 per year, and continue to get away with it.

    We believe the public should demand fairer compensation models from real estate agents. We believe that our flat fee model represents a fairer compensation model and keeps our compensation much more in line with average Vermont incomes.

    Thank you."

    The Buy/Sell Dilemma

    We are often asked what is the best strategy for buying a home when you have to sell your current home. Unfortunately there is no correct answer or optimal strategy. Instead you have to evaluate each buyer's personal situation in rendering advice.

    For instance, if a buyer is only looking to move if they purchase a specific property then the best strategy is probably to negotiate with the seller of the specific property first. If the buyer cannot come to an agreement on the specific property then there is no point in listing their current home for sale. On the other hand, if the buyer can come to an agreement with the seller then the buyer will want to list their current home for sale as quickly as possible.

    In contrast, if a buyer is set on moving regardless of a specific property coming for sale then the buyer would probably be best advised to put their house on the market immediately. The buyer can then start to identify types of properties and areas they might be interested in. By the time their home sells they will have likely identified one or more homes that suit their needs.

    In either case, sellers of homes are very wary of home selling contingencies. In the first scenario above, the buyer may have to agree to a so-called "kick out clause", where the seller can continue to market the home to other buyers and should the seller find another purchaser before the buyer can sell their home, the seller can terminate the contract with the buyer.

    Most sellers will agree to a provision in contract that terminates the kick out clause upon the buyer signing a contract for the sale of their current home.

    If you have a question about your specificsituation, please contact us. We're here to help.

    Procuring Cause in Vermont

    There seems to be a misunderstanding of what the standard is for "procuring cause" for a real estate agent to be entitled to a commission as a buyer's representative in Vermont. The Vermont Supreme Court has set the standard under Vermont law. Buyers (and sellers) should be aware of this standard when a real estate agent claims that they are owed a commission as the "procuring cause" of the sale. The legal standard is as follows:

    1. It is not enough to simply show the property once or even twice to a buyer. The Vermont Supreme Court has said " [T]he assumption that the broker first interested [the purchaser] in buying the property is not enough to constitute him as the procuring cause of the sale. Although the brokers efforts need not be the sole cause of the sale, it is essential that they dominate the transaction and amount to something more than an incidental or contributing influence. If it were otherwise, every broker who has any concern with the property might earn separate commissions on a single sale. 123 Vt. at 154-155, 186 A.2d at 183. Thus, the agent must demonstrate that they were the dominate agent in the transaction and assisted the buyer in more than just seeing the property. The agent must show that they advised and assisted the buyer throughout the transaction until the purchase was complete.

    2. Under Vermont law, to be entitled to a commission, "a broker must show that he procured a purchaser ready, willing, and able to purchase at the price and upon the terms prescribed by the seller." One example where the agent would not be considered the procuring cause under this standard is where the buyer is shown a property prior to selling their home. If the buyer cannot purchase the new property until they sell their existing home then the buyer is not currently "able" to purchase the property. The agent must continue working with the buyer until they are "able" to purchase to be considered the procuring cause. (See Ellis-Gould Corp. v. Kelly, 134 Vt. 255, 257, 356 A.2d 497, 498 (1976)). Thus, in this example the agent would have to be assisting in the purchase at the time that the buyer's house is sold.

    3. Finally, the agent claiming to be procuring cause must also show there was continuity and no break in the chain of events. If the agent shows the property in January to a buyer but the buyer decides to hold off on a purchase until June, the agent who first showed the property would not be entitled to a commission as the procuring cause unless the agent continued working with the buyer in June when they decided to purchase the property. If the buyer hires another agent in between January and June, the new agent would be entitled to the commission as the procuring cause.

    An agent claiming a commission as the "procuring cause" must be able to show that each of the factors above have been satisfied. If they cannot then, under Vermont law, the agent has not met the legal standard of "procuring cause" and is not entitled to a commission.

    Hopefully this helps clarify some of the confusion.

    If you still have questions about procuringcause, or any other real estate lingo, contact us.

    Radon Misconception By Agents

    Many agents seem confused on what levels of radon, if any, are acceptable in a home. There seems to be an industry wide misconception that the EPA recommends that action to reduce radon levels only be taken if a test shows levels exceeding 4.0 Pi/Cl. This is wrong.

    The EPA recommends that homeowners consider reducing radon levels if a test shows that level exceeds 2.0 Pi/Cl (www.epa.gov/radon/aboutus).

    Real estate agents representing buyers should not recommend that their buyers accept a home with levels under 4.0 Pi/Cl. The agent needs to look out for the safety and interest of their buyer. The buyer should be able to make an informed decision for their family. Some families may be fine with levels between 2.0 Pi/Cl and 4.0 Pi/Cl, while others may not. At the very least each family should be able to decide for themselves without being forced to continue with a transaction for a home that they may not feel completely comfortable with purchasing once they know the radon levels.

    If you have any questions, or would like more information, please contact us.

    Time for A Change

    How is it that despite incredible advancements in the technology available to real estate agents and tremendous increases in agent productivity and efficiency is it possible that the commission charged by most firms has not changed in the last 30 years and is still 6% of the sales price? That defies every basic economic principle. I cannot think of another service industry where advancements in technology and productivity did not lead to lower prices.

    One comparable example is stock brokerage firms. Firms used to charge hundreds of dollars to execute trades for their clients. Enter companies like E-Trade and Scott Trade who offered to execute trades for $15 or less. Now most brokerage firms do not even charge their clients to execute trades. Instead they focus their services on advice and wealth management.

    In addition to being more efficient, studies have been done that demonstrate that real estate agents do not end up securing higher prices than homeowners that sell their own homes. In fact Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner cite these studies in their book Super Freakonomics leading them to conclude that when analyzing which type of agent provides greater value a pimp or Realtor, "it seems clear that a pimp's services are considerably more valuable than a Realtor's."

    The role of an agent has changed. Like changes in the stock brokerage industry, the role of an agent these days is to utilize their knowledge as well as the technology available to them to provide advice for their clients. Their role is not to be a market maker helping buyers and sellers find one another. The internet allows buyers and sellers to find one another. Instead, buyers and sellers need advice through the process once they find one another. That is the role of the agent and the fees charged should be commensurate with the services provided.

    It is time for a change.

    If you agree with us, then Flat Fee is the real estate company for you. Comment below and let us know what you think, or contact us here.

    Flat Fee in vermontbiz.com

    From yesterday's (04/13/12) vermontbiz.com

    According to analysis of the MLS (Multiple Listing Service), real estate sales in Vermont increased by slightly over 10 percent in the first quarter of 2012. Compared to last year, MLS data for 2012 shows 955 sales while the first quarter of 2011 saw total sales of 867. This increase can be attributed to increased buyer confidence that the housing market is starting to return to equilibrium after 2008s Great Recession.

    While we still arent seeing the same level of confidence that we did in 2006 or 2007, it is greater now than at any point during the prior four years, said Rob Foley, owner of Flat Fee Real Estate in Burlington. MLS data shows that Chittenden County experienced an increase from 224 sales in the first quarter of 2011 to 243 sales in the first quarter of 2012, and the median home price increased by $1,000.

    While experts warn that the national housing market could suffer another blow from the shadow market of foreclosures (proceedings that banks have been delaying until the robo-signing litigation is completed), Foley believes that the Vermont market will be largely unaffected, and will continue its recovery. The Vermont market is more stable, and in better health, than national markets. Our state sees less speculative housing activity, lending practices are more conservative, and inventory tends to track carefully to primary home ownership demand, all of which lead me to expect a continued recovery of Vermont home prices.

    Renting to Own

    Flat Fee's Rob Foley quoted in Pittsburgh Post Gazette story regarding "lease to own".

    Comments

    1. Oscar on

      People buy life insurance, usllauy in trust so it doesn't also get included in the estate, in order to pay estate taxes. That's about 97% of what you need to know. Outside of that you just need to look around for the specific information you're looking for. Was this answer helpful?

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